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steve jobs was really bringing apple to the forefront -- >> a happening place. >> it is. it's where things happen. that's why we're here, steve rattner. >> washington is the place. with us on set, economic analyst steve rattner. also political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. andrea mitchell. and in new york, msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. and the co-anchor of "street signs," brian sullivan. we've got a lot to talk about, mike barnicle, but i saw a headline on the front page of "usa today," a tease that is very intriguing, and that is one of the greatest players in major league baseball trying to get his worth right now. and if i were a major league team, i would pass on josh hamilton in a new york second because the guy phoned it in when his team needed him the most. there's an attitude problem. and yet he could be such a huge payoff. are the red sox looking at josh hamilton? >> i think any team that's looking at hamilton is looking at no longer than three years with him because of the things you just mentioned. >> he, of course, had an ad
by the supreme court could result in the roe v. wade of guy rights. joining me now is political strategist steve elmendorf and chris geithner, senior political reporter for buzz feed. steve, i want to go to you first on this. there has been a lot of discussion and a lot of back and forth whether it's a good thing for marriage equality for the supreme court to take up these issues. some folks think better to leave it at the state level. there has been a lot of progress there. are you bullish or bearish on this? >> i'm bullish. i think the supreme court is going to do the right thing. you know, it's hard to predict, but i think the country has been moving so fast in the right direction. the court is not immune to public opinion. the court is not immune to the wind blowing through the country. and it's so clear where we're moving and the progress we've made in the last five years has been amazing. and i think the court is going to do the right thing. >> chris, let's talk a little bit about public opinion. because we have some polling that shows a breathtaking change of public opinion on this. in 20
former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner. >> financier. >> rattner is here. i like -- and we have to go back to that. it's the truth. >> it is! >> money is money. >> in washington, msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> we saw him on the streets of d.c. yesterday, and he was very cagey. >> the mean streets of d.c. >> yes. he was so cagey. >> he was. >> yes. yes. >> you can't ever ask those guys what they're doing, wherever they are. where you going? with who? a meeting. >> auditioning for a gang is what i'm doing. >> right. >> yes, exactly. lots of luck with that one. >> should we get to the news? >> fantastic. boy, there's some stories here, unbelievable. >> in the least. >> you talk about libya. i tell you what, you've got assad about to cross that red line. he's going to see russia leaving quick. i think you'll see even troops going in there if he starts using chemical weapons against his own people. about to cross the line. egypt, morsi in trouble. the biggest revolt since mubarak was pushed out of power. "the new york times
'll be well behaved. >> sort of. >> i'm steve kornacki. i'm a resident party animal. you haven't seen the pictures of the 2002 massachusetts gubernatorial debate watch party. >> what? >> we stand corrected. it's always a party here in "the cycle." >>> developing news this hour. protesters rae main out of michigan's capitol building urging the governor not to sign right to work legislation and barring them from requiring workers to pay union dues as a condition of employment. the state house passed both bills today dealing with private and public sector unions. protesters were shouting "shame on you" from the gallery. michael moore said they're up to 15,000 people at the protest. state senate passed both bills last week and now michigan governor rick snyder says he'll sign them as early as tomorrow. nbc's ron mott is there. what's the latest? >> reporter: hey there, good day to you. i'm not sure about 15,000 number but there are still a lot of folks here. most of them have probably started making their away from the state capitol because the measures here to protest have come and gone.
guys happy. >> no. end the suspense for me and steve and crystal and alleviate trey's boredom and tell us how the story will end. >> i wish i knew the answer. my wife thinks i'm an optimist and thinks it's higher is serotonin. think about the politics and so many moving pieces. all this conversation now about the deals that we are talking about and the boundaries are so narrow and nowhere equal to what we need to do. we top the keep america solvent and the advanced government should do. we need to renew the country and we are not even close to talking about that. you can make it very pessimistic even for this higher is serotonin optimist that we are entering a bad period for the u.s. and unless our folks coming to and get their act together. >> a lot of energy and time devoted to an artificially created crisis. matt miller, thanks for joining us. next, have you sent your holiday cards yet? if not, you are not alone. why more americans are taking a pass on this tradition. you ever notice that some people just have a knack for giving the perfect gift? they put real thought into it. and f
and "morning joe" economic analyst. steve brattner. >> he came with charts. willie, do you have a chart? >> no. >> he's disturbed. i don't know if you heard this. has he done this to you? >> we have two obesity stories we have to get to. we're not going to break. >> stalling right now. >> the filibuster reform should be passed but not passed yet. our executive producer, alex, comes up to me this morning. like the syndrome, you stay here long enough start walking with a strut. alex corson, hey, call me acc 47. >> he's getting bold. >> yes! >> is that like a phil cavens thing? >> yes! >> i'm like, seriously, karins? so phil cabins? >> the baseball announcer in high school called him phil cabins. that stuck with him. >> think of all the things you've been called. >> i'm called that everyday. apparently i said something yesterday. >> what did you do? >> something about -- >> did you get in trouble? i don't know. i got a call from hugh hewitt. >> the radio guy? >> he's like, did you -- i just want to talk about what you said today. it was like 7:30 at night, the kids are running around, you know. i
this year in 2012. they did that today. amazing. joining us is steve clemmons. he writes at the washington note and atlantic magazine. steve is also a former policy adviser for new mexico senator jeff bingaman. thank you for being here. >> great to be with you rachel. >> am i being naive to think this was going to pass? >> a lot of people thought it was going to pass. of all the treaties, this would be the easiest to pass. there were other treaties pending. this is about people in need and it didn't. this is a branch of the gop that did you want represent all republicans, but it's the obnoxious nationalist wing that really resents any international deal making. there's a lot of worry not just about people with disabilities, but all the other treaties that position the united states and show that it can be the primary sculptor of global affairs, and we're defecting from that as of today's vote. >> so 126 countries ratifying this, but us, not ratifying it. particularly when it's modeled on our law. that takes us out of a global leadership role? >> it leaves a void that the united states is w
about israel and how many times they moved the red line. >> steve, the interesting thing about this syrian situation is there could be other kcountries that decide to act militarily or there could be a coalition that does this. it won't have to be the united states alone. yesterday we had goldberg on, your colleague at the atlantic, who reported israel is preparing, turkey is preparing. i also assume at this point the tax cutter, uae, the gulf states would participate in something like this as well. what do you know and what are you hearing? >> well, i think that's right and i think the right model to think about is libya and what you have in libya and what you may have in syria is essentially an atrocity driven strategy. in other words you get right to the edge of, you know, a benghazi wipeout or a potential real use of chemical weapons and then that drives the coalition response. i think it's highly doubtful that the qatar would take action but highly probable a calculation that involves turkey and thus nato forces were to take action if chemical weapons were to be used and i
could not do that -- sorry. >> peter, you are outnumbered because this man right here, steve kornacki, fully believes it's a fiscal slope and he's branded that on this show many, many times. 2-1 in favor of fiscal slope to a cliff. you're wrong, sir. good night. >> that's a great way to decide it. >> just because you're a -- >> guys, what's for dinner? >> i spend a lot of time on cnbc because you're outnumbered doesn't mean you're wrong. >> good point. >> jared and peter, thanks very much. maybe we'll have both of you back. we'll see. all right. we're waiting on news from the supreme court. they could finally decide to take up the issue of gay marriage today. next in the spinning, boehner and obama one on one. watch out, mr. speaker. you know the president knows how to drive to the hoop. "the cycle" rolls on friday, december 7th. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in ye
reporting. >>> now, this morning's first look at your "dish of scrambled politics." comedian steve colbert of south carolina is ready to replace senator jim demint. oh, are you, now? his publicist in an e-mail saying "stephen is honored by the ground swell of support from the palmetto state and looks forward to governor haley's called." >>> some conservatives are having emotional debates over the fiscal cliff negotiations. the arguments for higher taxes for the wealthy are getting very tense. ann coulter even tried a reality check on sean hannity. >> are you saying, then, for pr purposes, that they should give in to obama on the tax rate? >> not exactly. well, yeah, i guess i am, but -- >> you're saying capitulate to obama, who -- we don't have a revenue problem, ann. >> we lost the election, sean. >>> meanwhile, the house of representatives passed legislation yesterday removing the word lunatic from all federal laws. it's the latest move by congress to remove language seen as demeaning or out of date, like lunatic. >>> and in australia, prime minister julia gillard talked about the suppos
of voter latino and steve kornacki is my colleague and a senior writer for the john, the president's inauguration hasn't taken place yet and the political pun dut tri sauf and running with a premat touour nomination for je bush. if he's a brilliant candidate four years from now, why didn't he run this time? >> why didn't he run? >> yes. >> why didn't portman run? why didn't john kasich run? even in 2012 and as difficult as the situation was for president obama, those heavyweights within the republican party saw the writing on the wall, that it was going to be a very difficult race for even the best candidate, so they all held their fire for possibly 2016, so that's why you're seeing people talk about jeb bush and others. i left chris christie out of that mix as someone people were hoping would run, a strong candidate who would run in '12. that's why you're hearing the names come out now. jo ama >> amazing. newt gingrich, a man who knows a thing or two about the ladies, says hillary clinton would be close to unbeatable if she close to run. do you think we're looking a
me at the table is westin solutions, inc a company doi doing. steve coll and president of the new american foundation and a staff writer at the new yorker magazine. francis bernanke and dan dicker is it still at the table. i'm really curious about how this boom is going to transform american politics. i'm particularly concerned about climate, right? it seems to me that we are basically in certain ways headed in exactly the wrong direction, but also at the same time headed in the right direction. here's what i mean by that. k carbon emissions are the lowest in the country since 1992. that's largely because every btu of natural gas you substitute for coal, you get 50% of the emissions. at the same time we have this foss fill fuel boom, we have this decline in the carbon emissions. i wonder how should i feel from an environmental perspective about these two facts that seem to be in deep tension with each other? >> i think the main thing, chris, is we have to get on a path way to reduce emissions over time. natural gas is better than coal, but it does not get you there. you have to ha
. feels like membership. >>> good morning from new york. i'm steve in for chris hayes who will appear later in the program interviewing dan savage. it's about dan's marriage in washington state. they are one of the couples getting married there. after voters extended marriage rights to same-sex couples by popular vote last month. we have david johnston, the author of "fine print." he's a pulitzer prize winning tax writer at new york times and now at the college of law. we have the president and ceo of the center of american progress who served in the obama and clinton administrations, policy director of hillary clinton's campaign. laura flanders, founder of the editor of and the woman who hired me two years ago. thanks, as always for that. >> of course. >> anyway, on friday afternoon, house speaker john boehner attempted to paint a picture of white house negotiations and how to avoid going over the fiscal curve. i have been saying fiscal slope. now on the show, i'll go with curve. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. four days ag
and an msnbc political analyst, and steve mcmahon's a democratic strategist. michael, you're on the republican side, and what do you think of that? the argument made by brooks which is more sophisticated. make your deal now while you can get something for it because after january 1st you will just be saving your rear end. >> i think he's absolutely right. i think part of that deal should include giving the president what everybody in this town agrees on, and that is those middle tax cuts for the middle class out of the bush tax cuts. set that aside because everyone agrees we're not going to go after those. then it gives you some time and some room to really negotiate down on that -- what that -- >> we have to do all that by january 1st. >> and it can be done. chris, this is not rocket science. that piece is very easy to -- >> but once you do that, why don't you admit you're not -- you're going to let the top rates go back to 39.6%. >> you can do that, but this is the kicker. the republicans want to see that they're actually going to get something in the bargain that's going to be real and genu
sources of stimulus for this economy in the near ferm? >> steve, i like the humor around the group, and i think it's a slightly schizophrenic time. i think one can be deeply worried about the compression of growth, the collapse of inflation, and the possible revival of 1930s style policies around the world. that's deeply worrying. on the other hand, i think there is some space to be slightly optimistic that we're opening up opportunities for what i call a pivot to inhe flags both here in the united states and around the world. >> this is just around the corner, and it's going to destroy the economy and inflation has not ticked up. it's been low for the past few years. you say maybe a little inflation wouldn't be bad for the economy right here. kind of a counterintuitive argument to make. can you lay that case out a little bit? >> yeah. the big concern when you have a heavily indekted economy here in the united states and around the developed world the last thing you want is deflation, because that means the debt burdens get heavier and it becomes harder to pay them off. what you want esse
was on the stage afterwards talking to steve van zandt and max and all of a sudden they were looking behind me, they moved away and stopped talking. so i turned around and there he was. >> and there he was. >> there he was. >> and he gave you -- >> he put his hand out and i shook his hand. i tried to be cool, i wasn't. >> no. >> and then he said, come on, give me a hug. and i said, all right. and i hugged him, and -- >> and did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to judge, right. when do you stop the man hug. it's hard -- >> you got to give also this, the pat or did you just go slow dance. >> no, i went slow dance. >> you've got to be kidding. >> i went slow dance. i did. >> no pat? >> no pat, i went slow dance. but then he said the most amazing thing to me. he said, it's official, we're friends. >> oh, wow. that's nice. that's nice. >> sounds like getting a knighthood, a jersey knighthood. >>> neck, remember this from the final days of the presidential campaign? >> i will come on "morning joe" and i will shave off my mustache of 40 years if we lose any of those three sta
-sex marriage at the ballot box. joining us now to discuss is steve, chair of the gay and lesbian victory fund. great to have you. >> nice to be here, alex. s. >> so a lot of tea leaf read and arm chair prognostication around this. i am by no means a supreme court expert, but when i saw that they were taking up both doma and prop 8, question as to whether they would take up inform i them at all, it seemed to me a signal that the court was ready to make a big decision, and i just cannot imagine, especially when you have conservatives like john roberts, who maybe sort of a fiscal conservative and vote in support of something like citizens united, but socially does not seem to be as conservative as, say, scalia. that they would be looking at the ark of history and say they are ready to make this law of the land. your intripgs now three days after they announced? are you feeling bullish or bearish? i asked you this on friday. i ask again. >> i'll bullish. i think the court wants to get in front of history and behind it. it is so clear where the country is moving. there is a poll this morning that
he's saying he will do is, if you try to hold him up on the debt ceiling like steve just said, he will say to you, i will not do it and i will not negotiate on the debt ceiling and what his leverage is is sanity. his leverage is that everyone now knows that allowing it to crash is an insane act and they will not commit that insanity. >> i think it will be a lot harder for them. last time they were quite credible that they really would commit that sanity. >> they were crazier then and hadn't lost the election yet. >> that's right. it was right after 2010. they were at their height in terms of these new freshman tea party members. the tea party was in full swing. now there is a difference story. boehner does seem to have more control of the caucus and i don't think that they could credibly do it also because the american people have looked back on that whole debacle and said it was a mess, it was the republicans fault. the president is going to have the american people on his side in dealing with republicans and the debt ceiling. that's not to say that they are not concerned about i
, not just centrists but some conservatives, ohio congressman steve latourette, has argued giving the president what he wants and reducing the debt by $4 or $5 billion. >> it depend wlats what the pac is. this is an administration that has 1 trillion plus deficits for each four years. >> one part of that that republicans have talked about, that 2%, and whether you're going to protect tax break force them. steve latourette said some people who call me, they're more worried about the fiscal cliff than about rates going up a couple of points. thomas rooney in your party, if there is truly entitlement reforms that's going to preserve social security and medicare for generations to come, it's going to be very difficult for me to oppose higher rates for the rich. what about that? >> and to mr. rooney's point, if in fact there were fundamental, significant reform of medicare, medicaid and social security so that we in fact save and strengthen and secure those programs, just like we did in our budget,those were included in the president's proposal, then that's something that we would talk
. >> joining me now is steve and republican strategist and form are campaign manager for huckabee, jim saltsman. >> hello. >> pmr. demint has been trying o leverage his position as the tea party's uncompromising man in the gop and that his effort has failed or stalled. >> i don't think i agree with "the washington post" at all. i think he's had a great impact across the country and i think the move to the heritage makes a lot of sense to him personally. he always said he was going to be a two-term senator. had he a term less. he left early. he wasn't going to be a career politician. i think this makes a lot of sense for senator demint in a lot of ways and i think it's good for the conservative movement. >> he has supported candidates against more moderate republicans in primaries and then his candidate lost in the general election, including obviously richard mourdock in indiana, christine o'donnell, ken buck in colorado. what do you think is going to be the influence now for jim demint going into the heritage foundation? >> i think he's been a singular failure when you look at the candidates t
was on the stage afterwards talking to steve van zandt and max, and all of a sudden they were looking behind me. they moved away and stopped talking. so i turned around, and there he was. >> and there he was. >> there he was. >> and he gave you -- >> he put his hand out, and i shook his hand. i tried to be cool, i wasn't. >> no. >> and then he said, come on, give me a hug. and i said, all right. and i hugged him, and -- >> and did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to judge, right. when do you stop the man hug? it's hard -- >> you got to give also this, the pat, or did you just go slow dance? >> no, i went slow dance. >> you've got to be kidding. >> i went slow dance. i did. >> no pat? >> no pat, i went slow dance. but then he said the most amazing thing to me. he said, it's official, we're friends. >> oh, wow. that's nice. that's nice. >> sounds like getting a knighthood, a jersey knighthood. >>> next, remember this from the final days of the presidential campaign? >> i will come on "morning joe" and i will shave off my mustache of 40 years if we lose any of those three
a record of 1-10. they're 8-3 when kobe's held under 30. of course, everyone in l.a.'s waiting for steve nash to come back. if he does, everyone will be fine and no one will ever remember this dismal start. >>> now to the nfl and the new orleans saints bounty scandal players had their suspensions overturned by former commissioner paul tab beau, who was handling the appeals process. vilma and hargrove were still found guilty but scott fujita was cleared on the charge. all the team coach suspensions remain in effect. now the question is what does this all mean? mike, take it away. >> it means, one, the existing commissioner of football, goodell, took a helmet-to-helmet hit from the former commissioner, paul tagliabue -- >> slap. >> i mean, a real slap. two, it means that the players involved are going to have to get back pay now, i would assume, because they lost their whole season. >> how about the saints fans? >> well, the saints fans are on the periphery in this. but three, it means the blame has finally and assertively been put where it belonged all the time, on the coaching staff of t
telethon. >> i was on stage afterwards talking to steve van zandt and max weinberg, and then all of a sudden, they were looking behind me, they moved away and stopped talking. so, i turned around. there he was. >> and there he was. >> there he was. >> and he gave you -- >> and he came up and put his hand out, so i shook his hand, i tried to be cool. >> sure. >> i wasn't. and then he said, "come on, give me a hug," and i said, all right, and i hugged him, and -- >> then did he go, come on, stop, let me go! >> no. you know, that's always hard to judge, right? stop the man hug? you know, it's hard, but -- >> did you give -- you've got to give also this, the pat, or did you just go slow dance? >> no, i went slow dance. >> you've got to be kidding me. >> i did, i went slow dance, i did. >> no pat? >> no pat, i went slow dance. but then he said the most amazing thing to me. he said, "it's official, we're friends." >> oh, wow! that's nice. that's nice. >> i appreciate that. i appreciate christie admits his bromance. that's a good thing. >> okay. >> now, it wouldn't be cooler without lin
. >> congressman steve from new york and chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee. good afternoon, sir. >> hi, martin. >> congressman, notwithstanding the fact that speaker boehner's office is considered mathematically dyslexic by many economists, has it surprised you some republicans have actually condemned boehner's office and would much prefer to keep taxes as they are and take an axe to social programs, medicare, in order to reduce the deficit? >> what's to surprising about that? for so many republicans, they said in the 1990s they wanted medicare to wither on the vine. you know, they now think they have the opportunity to do it in 2012. speaker boehner's proposal is based on the mathematical equation, two plus two equals whatever you want it to be. that's not how you grow the middle class. you do it in a balanced way. let's reduce the deficit we've already supported, $2 trillion in spending cuts, but let's do it in a way by asking the richest 2% to do their fair and grow the economy by making smart investments and things like job creating infrastructure. that's wha
certainly does. >> donald trump, mark cuban. >> mark cuban did. and our good friend steve rattner. >> rattner. >> helped put us over the million-dollar mark. >> did you bring your check? >> unicef. i've got my check. >> good. i tried to remind you. we are working to find a cure for epilepsy. we hope the contributions will help, and $1 million will make a big difference. >> let's talk about -- we have the man of the moment here with us. to talk about today's headlines. let's start -- there's so much to talk about, but richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy
our troops in iraq and afghanistan indefinitely but making stuff up to prove his point, as steve bennett points out. obama never said the united states overreacted to 9/11 or did he apologize for our actions. >> 9/11 was an enormous trauma to our country. the fear and anger it provoked was understandable. but in some cases it led us to act contrary to our traditions and our ideas. >> dick cheney is up to his old tricks, still lobbying for endless war and lying to make his case. i'm joined by colonel lawrence wilkerson, former chief of staff at the state department and a visiting professor of government and public policy at the college of william and mary. it is amazing that dick cheney's view of the middle east hasn't changed a bit. does that surprise you? >> it doesn't surprise me. i would have thought he would have grown a little in wisdom since that time. one of the reasons the middle east is hostile to u.s. interests today is because we invaded iraq. >> he thinks we should still be there. what is your response? >> he thinks we should be there because he believes we should be
we stumbled upon this story. >>> up next, steve and i have gotten a lot of feedback on our debate over gun control monday. his response to your responses is next. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. >>> we got a lot of feedback for something i said in the show, so much i thought i should respond to it. the subject was guns and domestic violence and here's what i said. >> in a house with a gun
about the economy these days and the post-steve jobs era. >> even around christmastime when the products are popular as gifts. >> you think retail sales would translate well because there's so many other issues there besides how much they sell in the store. >> it's interesting. we'll see what happens with this case and if it has an impact of consumers that own these products. thank you very much. >>> marijuana is now legal under washington state law. that tops our look at stories around the "news nation." take a look. that's how they celebrated in washington state. the news came down after midnight as you know at the seattle center. it allows people to possess up to an ounce of pot, but they cannot smoke it in public. that looks like public to me. the police department will issue verbal warnings to violators. that explains the public video. lawyers for software company founder john mcafee sought guatemala denied his asylum. they detained him for entering the country illegally. he's wanted for questioning in connection with the murder of his neighbor. he denies any involvement and will li
'm steve kornacki. there's outrage maybe even criminal charges coming in that death of the nurse in england. wait a minute. are we being too hard on the pranksters? >> i'm krystal ball. in to the holiday spiritual. our friend is back at the table with tips to dare we say it enjoy the season? >>> all and that a federal case of it. why when it comes to gay marriage the train can't be stop. neither can we. it's "the cycle" and it's monday, december 10th. >>> it's monday, fun day here at "the cycle." let's get the party started. where will it land today? fiscal cliff? huh. so much for fun. well you know what? we at "the cycle" can make it fun. look at this. the president living it up in motown last hour calling on republicans to stop being party poopers. >> i believe america only succeeds and thrives when we've got a strong and growing middle class. i want us to bring down our deficits but i want to do it in a balanced, responsible way. and i want to reward -- i want a tax code that rewards businesses and manufacturers, like detroit diesel right here creating jobs right here in redford, right h
. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things like what the market is doing and being ready no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> are we going to go over the fiscal cliff? >> you know, i remain optimistic that there are enough people of good will in this town that recognize our economy will be much better off, american families will be much better off if we get this done. the most important thing we can do is make sure the middle class taxes do not go up on january 1st. and i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high-income individuals. >> there is big news tonight out of washington where speaker john boehner and obama are talking. thi
create strong, vibrant middle class. >> yeah. >> we talked to steve rattner about jobs coming back to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that i
because the end will be -- steve spurrier still hasn't recovered from his stint in washington. the guy was a football god. he went to washington and immediately the stories started, you know, that this guy was bush league. he was a college coach. if saban goes up and fails a second time -- and god bless him, he's done enough for alabama, he deserves that right, or do you want to be remembered the greatest college football coach of all time? he sticks around another ten years, wins more champion sshi people consider this guy the john wooden of college football. >> when you look at what they've done p college coaches, that could be the lure, but he was miserable when he was at miami. in his second year with the dolphins, he was looking for opportunities back at the college game. i think it would take a lot to get him back to the nfl. when you look at all the teams that will need coaches -- >> but why go? >> well, money. a lot of money. a whole lot of money. >> in the words of dire straits, he's got a daytime job. he's doing all right. but again, seriously. you've got the chance to be the
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